Bone Grafts

The relationship between your bone and a dental implant is vital for the health, stability, and long term success of your implant. Bone grafting provides solutions for people who have already experienced bone loss in an area in which they desire a dental implant. It can also prevent future bone loss from occurring following extractions. Bone grafting provides the most predictable and ideal outcome for implant placement.

Ridge Preservation (Socket Grafting)

An extraction site that is not treated with bone grafting can experience bone loss of 40-60% over time. If the socket is treated with graft material at the time of the extraction, new bone will be generated with minimal loss of alveolar bone height or width. The process of generating new bone after a ridge preservation is typically complete after 3-4 months. A complementary CT scan will be taken at the end of this healing process to determine if the area is healed and ready for implant placement. This provides the most predictable and ideal outcome for implant placement.

Sinus Grafting & Augmentation (Sinus Lift)

Sinus grafting also known as a sinus lift can provide a solution to patients who desire implants in the upper jaw but lack adequate bone height or width for proper implant stability. New bone is generated from this procedure providing a predictable and successful environment for implant placement and long-term health. The process of generating new bone after a sinus lift is typically complete after 4-5 months. A complementary CT scan will be taken at the end of this healing process to determine if the area is healed and ready for implant placement. A sinus lift can provide patients who have been told that implants are not an option due to bone loss, a perfect solution for implant success.

Bone Grafting at the Time of Implant Placement

An implant’s health and long term success can be directly related to the quality and quantity of the bone surrounding it. Small defects in the bone or the absence of bone along the implant wall can allow for pocketing. These pockets can cause further bone loss and affect the health of the implant. If there are any bone defects surrounding the implant at the time of placement, bone grafting will be placed in the defective area to provide the implant with the most predictable and ideal outcome for implant success.

Bone Grafting for Alveolar Defects

Alveolar defects can occur for various reasons. Defects can be found after trauma to the jaw bones, removal of cysts or lesions or congenital defects. Bone grafting can be a solution for resolving these defects and generating bone where it was absent. Smaller defects can possibly be resolved with minor grafts and one or more simple procedures. Larger defects might require more extensive grafting and multiple procedures over a longer period of time. Our state-of-the-art CT scanner will help diagnose the severity of the defect and monitor the process of generating bone.

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